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afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to create many relationships. this is closed and personal, it is an intimate space. i have a daughter that was close to 1000 facebook friends. it has no advertisements. no data mining, it is private and secure. it bridges the formal and informal world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put info
and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we u
is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on. this calls for us to spend $8 million do
, october 23, 2012. this is the land use and economic development committee of the san francisco board of supervisors. my name is eric mar, chairman of the committee, to my right is melina cohen and also david camp camp. miss miller. >> please be sure to turn off all electronic devices. documents to be included as part of the file should be submitted to the clerk. items acted upon today will appear on the october 23rd board of supervisors meeting unless otherwise stated. >> i want to thank our sfgtv staff for televising this today. we have 3 items on the agenda. we have had a request to move item 3 above item 2. is there any objection to that, colleagues? please call item 1. >> item 1. >> changes to the planning code, uses, signsing building features, floor area ratio, parking and compliance in specified use districts. >> council member olague >> colleagues, thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to be here. today i am respectfully asking the land use committee to split file no. 110548 for the purpose of making a minor change to the planning code in my district, speci
why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you very much. [applause] >> th
push out the idea to players anywhere in a snap. and not just the nfl. down the road the cardinals used the same system developed by denver based player link. >> ceo of player link used by the denver broncos, the cincinnati bengals, san diego chargers as well as the bears and the beloved green bay packers. before we explain the solution that you come up with plane expo me the problem. my career with the spartans we had a playback that was about yea big. i understand the ones the nfl use are significantly larger. >> i'm sure since your all star days they have grown over time. there are many teams using traditional play books. there is no reason you have to make this change. teams have done things their own way for a long time. >> now they are enormous. >> 300 pages and not only do they have to print them and distribute them every week they had to make play changes and the team would have to give back to play books, count them up and make sure they got back and then destroy them. >> and dvds on top of that. >> absolutely. the traditional way was player would come down and ask for a series
we handle drug enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population o
am today. i can think of no more important calling than to use the skills and my energy to give back to all of you in any way that i can. that is what has led me through so many of my life's endeavors volunteering in the major's office as a teenager, and serving on the san francisco redevelopment agency commission sxh the fire commission and just recently getting my masters in public administration. >> i will tackle the tough problems head on. i will find real solutions to the lack of affordable housing and redesign our job training program to give the right skills to the unemployed people around us to make them the perfect job candidate for our small businesses. because small businesses provide most of our city's jobs, i will create a one-stop, for people looking to start one, or replace the huge bureaucracy that scares so many entrepreneurs from pursuing their dreams. with my experience working with local organization and san francisco law enforcement, i will create an atmosphere of trust and cooperation in the district that will lower street crime and gang violence and above all i
francisco, as someone who doesn't have a car i have and millions of us have wasted countless hours trying to get through our downtown corridor but i want to take a moment to thank the most important folks who are not here with us and that is the people of san francisco. for years before i joined the board of supervisors i served on with many volunteers the community advisory group to the central subway. with countless volunteers from the bay view, from visitation valley, from mission bay, south of market, union square, and of course thousands of residents and leaders from chinatown who went to countless public meetings provided tens of thousands of signatures, and stood for years to work extremely hard for world class transportation into the heart of our city, but we know we are building the central subway not just based on our history but for our future. by the year 2040 we will have 100,000 new households and 200,000 new workers and thousands of new daily car trips. we have to prepare for the future. let me close with a couple of quick thoughts. first i believe that our connecting
idea, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opp
to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy and it's not something that we as americans want to
and friends talk with the right there live. it used to be kind of like "star trek" to be able to do that. you can do that these is a very affordable if you have train yourself on some of the equipment that we have and the resources that we have and be able to do that for the various senior centers that you live and work in and enjoy yourselves in. you're going to be able even to read a book online or be able to just have a game and download a game and play with your friends as well. we are all lucky to live in san francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology
chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very poised and well spoken and at ease. i think our professors loved him. he liked being a student, even studying at the national war college a few years ago. he always seemed to genuinely enjoying studying and debating and was immersed in classes and activities of the school. particularly the hastings law journal, where he became managing editor. he very much liked the art of argument and trial law. he used to go to the courts nearby to watch very high profile trials and legendary judges and litigators. while he spent lots of times on the hastings campus, whether in library or out on what is called the beach in front of the school, he also liked to get off-campus and would often go for a run across golden gate bridge or play
no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles defini
to vote for? these are telling me that the tactics that president obama is using, talking about diners, bayonets and big birds, they're rubbing people the wrong way. in part because they want to focus on jobs in the economy, which is this big, darker issue that the country is facing right now. it's worrying people a lot. and so, the idea that he can talk about things like the binders comment, which is really just a play off a comment that mitt romney made during the presidential debate, where he talks about his desire to hire a lot of women. and it's not helping him. i think that's reflected in the poll numbers because you're seeing right now romney is tied, or seems to have a kind of momentum moving into the time week. that's just what pollsters are saying. i think democrats feel that this will help particularly with women voters, because they make up the majority, and if they can kind of put forward this argument that mitt romney wants to take away somethings that are very important to them, then they can get the edge amongst that party leck rate. which in a very close election can b
, welcome to cash in. we have john and traces and joining us sally cone is with us. and i want to start wu. burned out workers helping the economy. how does that work? >> if we live in utopia they would skip to work and share cookies on the coffee break. we are seeing even though people are in jobs they can't stand. myself not included. you go to work because you have pay the bills and keep yourosholted going. you are not quiting on yourself and that is part of the american drive that is keeping the going. >> is it good that 63 percent . workers feel stressed out and extreme fatigue. is that good for business? >> no, it is not good that americans are feeling stressed out. we are in bad economic times and have the lowest labor participate . 37 million americans are in poverty out there. but the fact that americans show up and go to work. it is what the greatest generation did in world war ii. i have been over to see what our soldiers are doing. times are tough and merrence are stressed and we have structurally high unemployment and america is n used to that. but americans show up to work an
combination thereof. to change your life for the better, to be better than you are today. use this resource. work to improve yourself because you will have a happier life in the end. will see it on one of my morning walks or bike rides. thank you very much. >> my goodness, what a rich a day. we can all have hope and not be fearful about anything. we take that attitude that we can reverse things. haute not going to tell them what my next birthday is going to be. she was born in 1932. one woman looked up at me and says, dear? she found out it was ok. we can all have the ability to do whatever we want to do. when she is not wrapping -- rapping, she is the co-director on the center for elder abuse and neglect, the university of california, irvine. a program called the institute of aging to 2007, i am proud to serve on that board. from catholic university in washington, who is started with the first song. there is no excuse for elder abuse. >> i am very happy to be here to talk to you all a little bit about elder abuse. there is about 5 million people. ♪ a little louder. you want me to rap?
we talk about the spirit of giving back and loving what you do, it is the spirit that drives us saying we believe in life and we believe in each other and we want our community to be stronger. >> what is life without spirit and inspiration. it is so important. you brought so much and i absolutely thank you for that. and janice i know you are up to cool stuff, too. >> yes. i am executive producing work in the silicon valley, so, i am very excited about that. and veteran radio veteran nick parker is the mc. it will be wonderful to work with hick. >> that is wonderful. we can soak up all that energy and light. i want everyone to get there, so, please get your tickets if you want to attend tonight's in the spirit awards at 6:30, tonight, sunday, at the scottish wright center in oakland. thank you for all you do. you stay right there because we have so much more inspiration for you. -i'll never forget that moment. woman: as long as i live. man: i realized, at that moment, when we first saw the damage, these people really needed us and i was going to make a difference, right her
for this station for having us. from community methodist church in fairfield, i've been the pastor for five years. people said that they will be watching us. if not, they'll tape it. today, we're going to be talking about dr. howard thurman. you may ask, who is howard thurman? he is one of the greatest religious figures of our times. and we are grateful to have the pastor who bounded that church in 1944. it's still active and very alive and a colleague of mine and friend, reverend dr. dorothy blake is the pastor since the nineties. great to see you, dorothy. >> thank you, and thank you for inviting me. >> glad to have you. >> i want to tell you how much i aappreciate your work not only as a pastor but a host for mosaic for 11 years. >> thank you. >> thank you for your commitment and the invitation to being here. you know, we went to school together >>> 40 years ago. >> what's been your journey to let people know who don't know you? >> on fad yaition from the pack school of religion, i worked as the assistant to the president of the -- at that time. the unfortunate of alabama was not integrated in
it for me? >> sure. basically he is saying that the terminology used in the original report is fine. i used language that what would be the traditional academic version of the language and he is okay. he doesn't feel there is a reason to make change scption he understands it's it was done accordingly and reasons why i changed the language is primarily it was the language used in the city and since was to deal with san francisco and the discussion going on at the time i wanted to keeplet language the same to that discussion and why i had the definitions the way it was and he wanted changes made that were more traditional in nature. >> are you a academic or a card carrying member of a amdemmic institution? >> no. >> thank you. >> before we take any action is there any member of the public that would like to speak on this item? seeing none public comment is closed. mr. fried in terms of here, the lafco we can make the changes? >> yes, you can or if you don't want to. >> it's up to the commission. commissioner avalos. >> i don't feel strongly about makes changes. the report was complete
an iron dome program to stop those missiles. that is how i have used my travels. when i travel to israel and when i travel to the region. the central question at this point is going to be, who is going to be credible to all parties involved. they can look at my track record, whether it is iran sanctions, dealing with counterterrorism, supporting democracy, supporting women's writes, supporting religious minorities, they can save the president of the united states has stood on the right side of history. that kind of credibility is precisely why we have been able to show leadership on a wide range of issues. >> you can watch the entire final debate on foreign policy between president obama and mitt romney today at 12:10 eastern here on c-span. >> this is the downsizing of the charts. you are watching it live. one of 10,000 homes they are trying to get done in the next four years. these are houses that are never coming back. >> one-family every 20 minutes moving out. >> moving out of detroit. >> these houses are disappearing from the landscape. >> just recently, 164 firefighters were laid o
happy that all of you could come out and join us, you know, on this evening. my namey. the director of the night rover challenge. i'm going to kind of be the moderator for tonight, as we go through this first-ever challenge america summit. so i've got just a few things that, you know, i wanted to do with everyone, before we get into the program. first of all, i just want to take a minute and have everyone just look around this room. in this room, we have amazing people that are corporate, nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful,interf people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are, what we're tiqp)q)s that we have.roup of so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open, unoodle,
back to us and talk to us and give us an update if they're changing policy on us? >> well, this came out of -- this should have happened months ago because if i recall right, the redevelopment agency was dissolved in, what, john, february, march? and then there was a lot to do on the union negotiations with them because they had rights. so i do think that it would not necessarily be bad in the next couple months to have an update from them and, you know, coordinate that in some of the topics that might be timely since we're going to be going into budget again. the biggest hurdle, honestly, right now the biggest hurdle is a software system that was designed and installed that is extremely difficult and it has some issues in business practice. in other words, when like if pamela were doing, and she'll be up here, but fa if she was doing a process it has to lack at what are the rules. this thing doesn't, it's very difficult and there's recognition all throughout the city that this has caused problems for a lot of departments and those are the kinds of things we're running into. it's
orion budget and some other radical proposals, instead of moving us forward on jobs, it would take us down a sharp right turn back into the ditch. i think we can prepare it -- repair those injustices. >> i do not want to get bogged down in numbers, but when you talk about uranium enrichment, things can provoke anxiety in terms of what iran either is or is not doing. you need to enrich uranium between 3%-5% for the purposes of nuclear power. they have a knowledge -- acknowledged to the u.n. uranium enrichment upwards of 20% and they now claim it is for medical research. the standard for web and eyes that uranium is enriched up to 85% -- for enriched uranium is up to 85%. there are some who say that you can make a more crude bomb with enriched uranium at 20%. the image that comes to me as a bunch of uranium in a truck parked somewhere at a busy intersection in tel aviv or jerusalem. what does it mean that iran already has uranium enriched to a level of 20% that could be used for an inefficient bomb? what does this say about the sufficiency of the sanctions regime the u.s. has in place a
] had a comment here. so, let's make sure we have a motion in front of us first. >> i moved it. >> moved and seconded? >> second. >> second. the motion is before us. >> david filcoff. thank you for the discussion. i'm excited about this policy. i get very excited about commission policy. i may be the only one, but hey. so, i was -- >> careful with the podium. >>> yes, sorry. i'm sorry i was actually not at the cac meeting last month because it was just before a jewish holiday. but i had some quick comments on this. i'm very supportive of the proposal, but just had some minor tweaks. on page 1 of the policy itself under personnel management, it says personal costs, i believe that should probably read "personnel costs." with regard to commissioner moran's amendment, if just want to be careful that we're not requiring some particular set of findings in the budget adoption resolution for each increase and each enterprise or any particular line item that exceeds the cost of inflation if that -- if the intent -- and i understand it, with the intent that there be some general statement in an ad
an almost round 40 a. for us, it is a the best way to connect because they live very far away and we do not get to see the mother rise. it is an important way for all of us to be able to connect with our families and with our communities. for americans living with disabilities, many of whom are also aging americans, broadband and commuters -- computers can provide even more critical tools for health and wellness. they allow someone with a speech impairment to e-mail her doctor, a person who is mobility limited to its in glasses -- classes online, and for someone else to work at home. 29% of people with disabilities would join the work force if telecommuting were actually a viable option for them. before working at home, however, broadband is now a necessity for anyone searching for a job. many job openings are only posted online. about 80% of fortune 500 companies only accept job applications online. and about 60% of working americans use the internet as an integral part of their jobs every single day. if you do not have broadband, you are increasingly cut off from these opportunities.
americans popped so many pills. have psycho pharmaceuticals turned us into a zombie nation? or should we just go with the flow and embrace the brave new world of mood control? we'll ask new york magazine journalist ariel levy and washington psychiatrist dr. brian doyle. >> a.d.m. the nature of what's to come. >> welcome. ariel levy, you authored a cover story for "new york magazine" which we see here "what are you on?" and you described new york today to -- you say sound the alarm, there is a new drug epidemic in town and most of the city wants in on it. in certain circles of new york, it is regular table conversation. we have entered the golden age of self-medication. drugs have become like hair products or cosmetics. this is brain styling, not mind altering, and you have a serious point to make there, but what is the extent of what you see going on in new york? >> well, i mean, i think new york is the same town that brought you woody allen and brought you everybody having a psychiatrist. there not a great deal of stigma to being neurotic in new york. it is accepted to the point of mayb
'twell -- used to that kind of weather. but they're being warmed by the way their team is playing and you say they go 2,000-miles to see the team but this is a world series and they're coming from all over the world. in a sea of blue and orange -- >> tigers. >> reporter: comes a stripe of a different coalready. orange and -- color. orange and black. where am i? i feel like i'm on second and king. nope, woodward and adams, detroit, michigan. you came from south carolina? >> we drove from minneapolis last night. >> texas. >> reporter: all part of giants' nation on tour. so far, the orange and blue aren't turning the orange and black black and blue. >> i got booed four times by the time i got off the airplane but every person has been real friendly. booing me but friendly. >> reporter: making the presence known and if it's a giants' win tonight you might consider sarah stumble from santa cruz a lucky charm. >> she took her friend kathleen bern the airline messed up. >> amazing. >> amazing, she also got first class tickets on the plane for the first time. that was cool 689. >> reporter: the coole
. when the lender makes the loan to you, they come to us and say that your business, for a variety of reasons, may not be strong enough to get a loan without a guarantee. it might be a business that is too young or is a type of business -- say, restaurants -- that are a little riskier than they want to deal with, or you do not have the kind of collateral a lender is looking for. "an sba lender will be able to make the loan with a guarantee that sba will be able to provide. we probably will about 225 sba loans this year. at any point in time, we have about 1500 loans in san francisco that are sba loans. a lot of them are restaurants because that is one of the areas that is very typical because it is a riskier business. but a lot of people in san francisco see that as an opportunity for them as well. we also partner with the golden gate restaurant association to help people understand how to do financing for restaurants. a lot of what we do is helping small businesses get access to credit. the sba loan program covers a range of small loans down to $25,000 and large loans up to $5 mil
. >> but everyone should be encouraged to apply. thank you again for hosting us. >> thank you for including us in "culturewire." ♪ >> hi, i'm jane konig, a member of the league of women voters. along with the league and sfgovtv, i'm here to discuss proposition a, a ballot measure that will be before the voters on november 6th. city college of san francisco has 9 campuses in the city and serves approximately 100,000 students each year. the state has reduced funding to ccsf by core academic courses, provide work force training, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you bot
>>> welcome to "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. for more than a dozen years u.s. army soldiers have been in combat in iraq, afghanistan, and elsewhere around the world stressing the force more severely than at any period since the vietnam war. while the army has ended operations in iraq soldiers still constitute the bulk of the international coalition doing the fighting and supporting in afghanistan and will continue to do so until the mission there ends in 2014. plus, the army is looking past the decade of war to prepare the force for future challenges including refocusing on the pacific. that will mean a change in equipment, personnel, and manpower levels as the service retools from having spent years fighting in the middle east and central asia. engineering that change in an era of tight resources is the army's 38th chief of staff, general ray odierno who joins us from the association of the annual conference and trade show. sir, welcome back. >> thank you. >> i wanted to start off. sequestration is the top issue in washington. you have frequently said that se
will be completely unfettered to use drug dogs however they wish. that could lead to a random sweeps of neighborhoods where people. limited and only by the restrictions the fourth abutment has on seizures. more broadly, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable cause is the totality of the circumstances. i think the state is advocating, if a police officer gets on the stand and
on the colorado ground game. and what happens to afghanistan's opium-growing region once the u.s. troops leave? kelly cobiella files a reporter's notebook. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." i'm margaret brennan. hurricane susan is churning its way up the east coast this evening, headed for landfall in the mid-atlantic region early next week, and a rendezvous with a wintry storm system from the west. here's the latest. sandy has already killed at least 58 people in the caribbean. a state of emergency has now been declared in nine states and the district of columbia. we have a team of correspondents standing by, and we begin with our hurricane consultant david bernard at our miami station wfor. >> reporter: good evening, margaret. not much change on the storm in intensity or the expected track. latest from the national hurricane center puts sandy at 75-mile-per-hour storm, 345 miles south of cape hatteras, north carolina, moving to the northeast at 13. based on that track, the best chance for significant windses, 58 miles per hour or greater, are going to be in the area
a conversation about how we would use any new survey results in informing our plan. what i have included in the packet for you today is a timeline and some background refresher materials on the two prior surveys we conducted. staff continues to incorporate the board's direction in our plan going forward on november 13th. we intend to come to you with proposals on how we will encourage and allow customers to express their interest in participating in the program. what's been referred to as pre-enrollment. and how we will work that pre-enrollment concept with the statutorily required opt out and how we will use survey results in surveys to be conducted. and november 30th we'll have a joint puc lasko where we'll be able to discuss these more fully with the entities that have been so closely engaged on the cca program. with that i'm happy to take any questions, but i really think the information i have provided so far was just sort of to prime the pump in for the upcoming meeting. >> the fairbanks are pulling, why were they hoe ebb he en[speaker not understood]? >> they have been chose tone
, i will make a suggestion... i mean i am... i do find it meaningful that the city attorney reminds us that we have no legal conflict either individually or collectively. i have no obligation to the executive director, the executive director obligation is to the commission as a group and to the city and county, not personal. i can understand why we don't have staff to investigate their supervisor, that makes complete sense. so in trying to... i just want you to create a window where we didn't just rush to do something that thoughtful people were flagging for. but as we were trying to construct it, as a question of legal conflict and of our confidence to do it and our responsibility to do it, which is the other part mr. gibner raised. there is the past practice, the past example involving the deputy director, where we did seek counsel from others so that it would not be a staff colleague doing the investigation, but this body handled it. and i quite honestly can't remember if i was on at that time, and if so, whether we analyzed this, i came on in 07, probably not in time for that item.
at the highest level of educating the visitors and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have the greatest subway system that can connect to our bart, to our caltrans, to up and down our muni lines. this central subway will be a great success. it will connect to some of the most densely populated and rapidly developing areas, and it will improve access to all of our vibrant communities, and really is investments like this that will foster loyalty among all of our public transit customers while we reduce carbon emissions, make our city cleaner and cleaner. i'm not the only one that thinks this way. you know i'm among many, many friends today in the audience, on stage and i would like to invite at this time someone who has made it a practice to visit our city regularly, to make sure this project was being planned well, that the initial funds that were granted to us by president obama and with
did not benefit from many of the job opportunities. and even at the tail end, what was given to us were jobs where nobody else could do it. and i can relay this project by project, and i have before harlan kelly, ed harrington, karen cubic, tyrone ju, and they kind of understand about this situation. now, what we have here is we have the hrc abruptly transferring compliance officers who deal with lb situations and other compliance officers to the city administrator's office. then you have you guys in the middle of the situation changing the rules without really getting the input from the lbes. nobody who is not a san franciscan should come here and say, i spoke to some lbes in san francisco and they kind of agree to go with the flow. that doesn't work. we don't want to badger sfpuc. but the fact is we lost on the waste system improvement project, and we were not, i repeat, not lose on the sewer system improvement project. because i have over 500 young men, i brought some of them here. i don't want to fill this chamber with some strong men. i don't want to go there, but we will not
shows distribution, most of us in here. you get anybody out here who is externalizing or anyone out here who is internalizing, as a psychologist, we try to bring them back in here so they're more healthy. that's what we study. when you're having problems in your life or any other area, if we can do something, talking to you versus talk therapy or medicine that might help you, what we're trying to do is get everybody back here so we're just kind of more balanced. with respect to the traumatic brain injuries and other types of things, that's much simpler for people to kind of understand that you had a concussive event or you had a t.b.i., traumatic brain injury, that's caused problems. we should be developing ways of helping to manage and treat those problems just like we do individuals who have the other types of problems. >> let me just add one thing there, which is it's a good question, but it highlights one of the challenges of introducing neuroscience today in the courtroom. at kent showed you some of his slides and mentioned during his talk, he is trying to develop treatments as he d
. good to have you with us today. ukrainians whore putti their hopes outside parliament. why britons are divided. and god's mission -- a trip along the dutch bible belt. the ukraine has been in a state of political paralysis for several years now. there are power struggles going on on many levels. ukrainians have been waiting to go to the polls for four years, but only now are parliamentary elections taking place. the eu is watching with some suspicion, especially after the controversial jailing ofhe former prime minister. her political archenemy still leads the country as president. and an increasing number of ukrainians are asking themselves who they can trust that all. one thing is clear -- it is not the political elite. >> it is quite an animated evening. an amateur ensembles stages a comedy about marriage, but it is less about love that about the dowry, money, and influence. just like in ukrainian politics says this journast w inved the actors to come to kiev's old market. the building has long since become a symbol. influential businessme want to privatize it, but these people
of thousands preparing for the worst as the category one storm barrels up the u.s. coastline and has already killed 58 people in the caribbean. welcome to 11 news sunday morning, i'm lisa robinson. >> and i'm mindy basara. an 800-mile swath of the country is in the crosshairs of sandy. >> residents on the east coast are preparing for winds, rain, and snow in some areas. >> we have live coverage with tony pann and jennifer franciotti. we begin with tony. >> today's not going to be a big deal. it will be a good day to prepare for things. we might get some rain and it will be breezy today but not a lot happening. right now 59 at the airport. northeast wind at 12. winds will pick up heading into the afternoon. you'd call it breezy, not windy, between 10 and 20 miles per hour. picking up rain on the outer fringes of the storm which is still way off the southeast coast. heavy rain off the eastern shore counties represented by the orange and red, a little rain around baltimore. the best chance for rain today is in the eastern shore counties, breezy with temperatures in the low 60's. the worst part
but there was no counterstrike. our men were abandoned. joining us now is john bolton. also cia operative michael scheuer. good to have you both here. >> if i may. lou: why and the world are we not able to get a straight answer over seven weeks about what happened to, why? who was responsible and why is the national media seen at -- seem nothing to be anything but lapdog sat? >> why can't we get straight answer? the story keeps shifting the administrations does no want to own up to the fundamental problem to deny reality. according to them outside is to be dumb -- defeated dumb -- defeated, copies removal was a triumph. that would require them to a bit they misjudged the situation. they did. there are four dead amicans. september 11 enters a timber 13 is important but they were not ready before hand and they should have been. that is the failure. >> i don't think they were not ready but i think they were chomping at the bit to rescue those people. people joined the military to go into harm's way. in a non perfect world you go with the best information and that you have. we don't let people be slaughtered from
>> and now, members of the first post-9/11 u.s. naval graduating class talk about their experience serving in iraq and afghanistan. this event held on september 11, 2012 is hosted by the navy memorial here in washington d.c. it's just under an hour. [applause] the mac thanks to all my classmates and coeditors and mentors who helped make this possible. in february to the night vision this book. everything is happening for me as an active-duty salt and afghanistan in kandahar. i was working for general nick nicholson, doing cool things is a swell stansell are now, supporting my country. maybe i should do a book. really, compared to ben wagner? really, compared to jacob sabe? and f-18 pilot to saved the stryker battalion. well, made cbs colleague, jason jackson. the story of this book were exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on
it's oysternomics 101. you start with a u.s. senator named ben. by helping restore thousands of acres of oyster beds, he kept hundreds of oystermen on the job... which keeps wholesalers in business... and that means more delivery companies... making deliveries to more restaurants... which hire more workers. and that means more oystermen. it's like he's out here with us. he's my friend, ben. i hope he's your friend, too. i'm ben cardin, and i approved this message. [captioning made possible by constellation energy group] >> bracing for sandy from the carolinas to boston, hundreds of thousands preparing for the worst as the category one storm barrels up the u.s. colvet -- coastline, has already killed 58 people in the caribbean. >> residents along a swath of the east coast from the mid atlantic region to the northeast are bracing for hurricane sandy. >> preparing for strong wind, torrential rains, flooding and snow in some areas. >> we have live coverage with tony pann, jennifer franciotti and ava marie in ocean city. we begin with tony who's been tracking the storm from the we
in the caribbean. it is expected to affect most of the eastern u.s., upwards of 60 million people. we have got fox news team coverage of the storm and a new concern, the vote. some speculate sandy could disrupt the election, something neither campaign wants to hear. it's forced both candidates to cancel events in crucial swing say thees. we will talk to governor bob mcdonnell. i'm shannon bream, america's news headquarters live from the nation's capitol starts right now. we are nine days away from the election and the candidates are focusing on the battleground states. voting is rounder way in florida and several other state, so what will it take to sway the undecided voters who have yet to commit? joining me, a romney supporter, congressman, thank you for your time today. >> hey, glad to be with you. >> reporter: stephanie cutter said this morning, they have momentum, they are racking up a number of key editorial endorsements and they feel good about where they are. how do you respond? >> i wouldn't trade places with them. i think there is an air of desperation at team obottom a. mitt romney's ro
, is this something that we used to have that and we have taken it off? >> it goes into the confidential report, don't we? >> we do. >> we get those in the confidential listing. >> i will see what we can add back on again. >> okay. >> public comment on number 8? >> could i ask you to repeat what you said about the whistle blower complaints? >> will they be in or not? >> mr. st. croix said that he will look into what additional information we could put on there relating to the whistle blower complaints. >> is is there a motion to adjourn the meeting? >> so moved. >> i did want to make a comment on eight. >> you did? >> okay. >> yes. >> ray heart, director of san francisco open government and you can sit there and attribute every negative and other motives that you want to me. i don't care. very frankly i have told you and every other body that i have appeared to before that my only two reasons to going to public meetings are to make sure that the nems members of the public are allowed to speak and allowed to gain access to public records that they need to speak intelligently to certain issues. i wen
is with us this afternoon and appreciate the work that he has been doing and ja -- ja king torres and the community members that stepped up and we have other members and former supervisor member dufty and cohen is out there often and you can see swing dancing in the plaza. i want to introduce to you theresa but also with theresa is a very special person. i want to introduce chef kevin so chef kevin has been incredible in helping the youth to understand the value of running a restaurant and has been working with them, and showing them how to cook basically, and i just saw chef kevin at another wonderful event, our california youth connections who work with our foster youth and donating his time and incredible jump laila and behind me i would like to introduce tammy, dominique, erin, deserie, chris, chef kevin and the leader of the pack theresa. plawz welcome old school cafe. [applause] and the mayor has presented them with a proclamation and they had time with him in his office and it was an honor to seeing the incredible youth doing what they do. they run the restaurant from th
are governed and guided by the charter mandate of requirement under rate payer assurance as the voter told us to enact in 2002 in particular, one of the most recent and largest items. in addition to that, that san francisco charter provision as well as prop e and prop a in 2002, the rate service process is put into place. and you've also recently adopted during the last budget process the rates policy. this rate payer assurance policy both furthers that transparency, furthers that oversight that you see and that you help govern here in san francisco. it assures that auditable wise use of rate payer services will continue to promote and ensure that the sfpuc stays on a strong track record of effective management. one of the -- also thing in the discussions with the various stakeholder groups is to walk through all the already adopted policies and provisions and protections in place. for the public, just quickly walking through the list, there are many. there is the san francisco charter, there is the budget laws and policies, the debt laws and policies, the environmental justice policy, the co
on airplane flying inside the hurricane right now. tell us what you know, what you're seeing and witnessing about this particular hurricane as you fly through it, jessica. jessica, can you hear me? >> yes, i can hear you. jessica williams on the noaa b-3 orion 800. we're exiting the storm environment from the northwest. >> jessica, what are you seeing inside the hurricane? >> on the northwest of the storm, we are in a lot of turbulence right now, occasional, moderate turbulence. there are spiral bands of precipitation around the northwest of the storm. it's still a very tropical storm in the center but on the northwest, it has more cold front features to it. >> what does that mean for the intensity of this storm from what you're witnessing on the northwest side? does that mean it's going to make it more powerful? >> i couldn't really understand your question. >> okay. >> but i believe what you're asking is being a tropical storm becoming more subtropical, the wind speed is spreading out. there's a higher wind speed that will affect the larger area. highest wind speeds we found 105 miles out
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